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You are not alone with Your Anxiety.

In the UK, there are 8,000,000 people suffering from an anxiety disorder at any one time.

 

The truth is that anxiety is a normal part of life. There is absolutely no way you can travel through life without dealing with anxiety. As living creatures, our minds and bodies are pre-programmed with anxiety, but there are times when these programmed responses, actually designed to keep us alive, can overreact and get out of hand, making modern-day life difficult.

There is no doubt about it; life in London is extremely stressful. You may be dealing with difficult employment or relationship issues that can easily lead to anxiety. I offer modern and intelligent therapy to my clients. I aim to get you unstuck and get your life back under control as soon as possible  

​Online Therapy is effective and convenient. We can have our appointments in the evenings or over the weekend. You will receive a Zoom link, and all you will need to do is click on it to begin our session together. 

These are the anxiety disorders that I treat.

 

Generalised anxiety disorder

Generalised anxiety disorder is characterised by marked symptoms of anxiety that persist for at least several months, for more days than not, manifested by either general apprehension (i.e. ‘free-floating anxiety’) or excessive worry focused on multiple everyday events, most often concerning family, health, finances, and school or work, together with additional symptoms such as muscular tension or motor restlessness, sympathetic autonomic over-activity, subjective experience of nervousness, difficulty maintaining concentration, irritability, or sleep disturbance. The symptoms result in significant distress or impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. The symptoms are not a manifestation of another health condition but not because of a substance or medication on the central nervous system.

 

 

Panic disorder

Panic disorder is characterised by recurrent unexpected panic attacks not restricted to stimuli or situations. Panic attacks are discrete episodes of intense fear or apprehension accompanied by the rapid and concurrent onset of several characteristic symptoms (e.g., palpitations or increased heart rate, sweating, trembling, shortness of breath, chest pain, dizziness or light-headedness, chills, hot flushes, fear of imminent death). In addition, panic disorder is characterised by persistent concern about the recurrence or significance of panic attacks or behaviours intended to avoid their recurrence that results in significant impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. The symptoms are not a manifestation of another medical condition and are not because of a substance or medication on the central nervous system.

 

Agoraphobia

Agoraphobia is characterised by marked and excessive fear or anxiety that occurs in response to multiple situations where escape might be difficult or help might not be available, such as using public transportation, being in crowds, being outside the home alone (e.g., in shops, theatres, standing in line). The individual is consistently anxious about these situations due to a fear of specific negative outcomes (e.g., panic attacks, other incapacitating or embarrassing physical symptoms). The situations are actively avoided, entered only under specific circumstances such as in the presence of a trusted companion, or endured with intense fear or anxiety. The symptoms persist for least several months and are sufficiently severe to result in significant distress or significant impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

 

 

Social anxiety disorder

Social anxiety disorder is characterised by marked and excessive fear or anxiety that consistently occurs in one or more social situations such as social interactions (e.g. having a conversation), doing something while feeling observed (e.g. eating or drinking in the presence of others), or performing in front of others (e.g. giving a speech). The individual is concerned that he or she will act in a way, or show anxiety symptoms, that will be negatively evaluated by others. Relevant social situations are consistently avoided or else endured with intense fear or anxiety. The symptoms persist for at least several months and are sufficiently severe to result in significant distress or significant impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

 

Separation anxiety disorder

Separation anxiety disorder is characterised by marked and excessive fear or anxiety about separation from specific attachment figures. In children and adolescents, separation anxiety typically focuses on caregivers, parents or other family members and the fear or anxiety is beyond what would be considered developmentally normative. In adults, the focus is typically on a romantic partner or children. Manifestations of separation anxiety may include thoughts of harm or untoward events befalling the attachment figure, reluctance to go to school or work, recurrent excessive distress upon separation, reluctance or refusal to sleep away from the attachment figure, and recurrent nightmares about separation. The symptoms persist for at least several months. They are sufficiently severe to result in significant distress or impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.

 

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder is characterised by the presence of persistent obsessions or compulsions, or most commonly both. Obsessions are repetitive and persistent thoughts, images, or impulses/urges that are intrusive, unwanted, and are commonly associated with anxiety. The individual attempts to ignore or suppress obsessions or to neutralize them by performing compulsions. Compulsions are repetitive behaviours including repetitive mental acts that the individual feels driven to perform in response to an obsession, according to rigid rules, or to achieve a sense of ‘completeness’. In order for obsessive-compulsive disorder to be diagnosed, obsessions and compulsions must be time consuming (e.g. taking more than an hour per day) or result in significant distress or significant impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational or other important areas of functioning.


ABOUT BARRY FLORIN

HUMAN GIVENS INSTITUTE

Psychotherapist

ACCEPTANCE AND COMMITMENT THERAPY

Psychotherapist

HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL

Clinical Training in Mind/Body Medicine

HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL

GPM for Borderline Personality Disorder

 

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